Roddy Körner

instagram:

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram

Since launching nearly four years ago, it has always been a priority to bring the Instagram community simple yet powerful tools that let people capture moments and express their creativity. Today, we’re excited to announce Hyperlapse from Instagram, a new app to capture high-quality time lapse videos even while in motion.

Traditionally, time lapse videos depend on holding your phone or camera still while you film. Hyperlapse from Instagram features built-in stabilization technology that lets you create moving, handheld time lapses that result in a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.

We designed Hyperlapse to be as simple as possible. You don’t need an account to create a hyperlapse. Instead, you open up straight to the camera. Tap once to begin recording and tap again to stop. Choose a playback speed that you like between 1x-12x and tap the green check mark to save it to your camera roll. You can share your video on Instagram easily from there.

From documenting your whole commute in seconds or the preparation of your dinner from start to finish to capturing an entire sunset as it unfolds, we’re thrilled about the creative possibilities Hyperlapse unlocks. We can’t wait to see what you’ll create.

To learn more about what stabilization looks like in Hyperlapse, check out this video.

To learn more about Hyperlapse from Instagram, check out help.instagram.com.

Hyperlapse from Instagram is available today for iOS devices in Apple’s App Store. It is currently only available for iOS.


bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska

bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho

If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.

On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 

The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.

Other useful Links:

How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper

How to be a BLM smokejumper

Smokejumper status report

McCall Jumplist

Young Men and Fire

Stats:

  • McCall base was founded in 1943
  • John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
  • 1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
  • 1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
  • 1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
  • There are currently 70 active jumpers
  • McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
  • McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska

8 Places You Must Visit in Japan

ileftmyheartintokyo:

image
Truth is, after 3 weeks in Japan, I was sold. Strike that. I was actually sold in the first few hours in Tokyo, right after my mind cleared a bit of the fog it was submerged into during the intercontinental flight. The scenarios revealing in front of me were so different from everything I previously knew and so unbelievable, that I gave in and only days into our trip, I already knew Japan was the most amazing country I’ve ever been too and probably I’ll ever go to. Its culture is so uniquely beautiful, the customs so incredible and the people so civilized, that it almost makes my eyes water. 
During our trip to Japan we used a JR Pass, and this gave us great mobility and flexibility when it came to exploring different parts of the country. It also made the formalities more swift, as we avoided the cues in front of the ticket offices. But what we both liked best about this travel style was that all in all, we didn’t need much planning ahead and we could allow spontaneity to take over from time to time. So we ended up exploring quite a few places in Kanto, Chubu and Kinki regions in central Japan. Here are only the ones we consider a definite must see.  

image

Tokyo

Tokyo grew on me in unexpected ways, to the point that I know refer to it as my favorite city in the whole world. Of course, this is highly subjective, but as I think anyone who visited this mad city would agree, Tokyo is a different world altogether. You’ll probably either love it or hate it, but there’s little space in between for this place to leave you cold. What makes Tokyo so special in my eyes is simple: the people. Don’t expect neither futuristic, nor beautiful architecture. But with over 13 million people walking it’s streets every day, the capital of Japan definitely has a soul and multiple personalities. Best places to see my point proven right are a stop at Shibuya and a stroll through Yoyogi Park on a Sunday.

Read More

Must. Visit. Tokyo. Soon!


bestmadeco:

Cast iron cookware saw its heyday in America’s late 19th century and on into the middle of the 20th. High quality ore from Ohio and Pennsylvania was cast into skillets, dutch ovens, waffle irons, and a whole lot else. These pieces were finished by hand, their cooking surfaces were machined smooth and the iron’s rough cast texture was removed. This removal of metal also made for lighter pans that were easier to use, were faster to season, and more non-stick. This finishing process is a thing of the past, and is one of the main benefits for collecting and using vintage cast iron. 
There are many ‘recipes’ for how to season a cast iron pan. Many of these recipes have been handed down from generation to generation. Our process, which we’ve tested extensively, yields excellent results provided you use the right oil, and don’t rush the process. 
What you need:
Freshly cast iron pan cookwareIt’s important that the pan be as cleaned down to the bare iron if possible. All prior seasoning should be removed with a lye solution, and any rust must be removed with vinegar, or electrolysis. 
Flaxseed oilThe choice of oil is very important. It’s necessary to choose an oil that will polymerize, harden, and adhere to the pan. Flaxseed oil is a common choice, but we’ve also gotten satisfactory results from shortening (Crisco). 
OvenYour home oven will heat the oil that’s been applied to the pan and cause it to harden and darken. This is the part of the process that can’t be rushed, it takes some time. 
The process:
Wash your pan in hot soapy water to remove any surface oils. Then heat in a 200 ºF oven until completely dry. The heat will also ‘open’ up the iron making it more accepting of the seasoning.
Apply a thin coat of flaxseed oil to the hot pan. Coat it entirely. You’ll want to use an oven mitt since the pan will be pretty hot. 
Wipe away all of the remaining oil. There will still be a very thin coat on the pan, but it should not appear oily. Using too much oil will result in streaks and a sticky surface.  
Bake the pan upside down in a 500 ºF oven for 30 minutes. Then shut the oven off and let the pan cool inside. Heating the oil will cause it to create polymer chains, making for a dark, smooth surface. 
Repeat this seasoning process at least three times before cooking in the pan. The seasoning will continue to build as you use the pan, becoming  darker and increasingly non-stick. The pan will also be easier to clean as the seasoning layer builds.  
You should always heat cast iron with something in it, even if it’s only a bit of cooking oil. You can damage the seasoning by overheating it. Avoid cooking acidic foods such as tomatoes or citrus in the pan for long periods of time. They’ll react with the seasoning and the iron and impart an unpleasant flavor.
To clean, deglaze the pan with a bit of water while it is still hot. Let the pan cool and use your hands or a plastic scrub pad to remove any stubborn bits of food. A bit of kosher salt can also be used to soak up excess oil, and to act as a mild abrasive. Many folks advocate for not using any soap at all, but we’ve found a small amount of dish soap won’t harm a well seasoned pan. But do avoid using harsh abrasives and cleaning detergents. Wipe thoroughly dry, or heat on the stove top to dry, and store in a safe, dry place. 

With proper seasoning (don’t rush it) and proper care a vintage cast iron pan will last for generations to come.  View Larger

bestmadeco:

Cast iron cookware saw its heyday in America’s late 19th century and on into the middle of the 20th. High quality ore from Ohio and Pennsylvania was cast into skillets, dutch ovens, waffle irons, and a whole lot else. These pieces were finished by hand, their cooking surfaces were machined smooth and the iron’s rough cast texture was removed. This removal of metal also made for lighter pans that were easier to use, were faster to season, and more non-stick. This finishing process is a thing of the past, and is one of the main benefits for collecting and using vintage cast iron. 

There are many ‘recipes’ for how to season a cast iron pan. Many of these recipes have been handed down from generation to generation. Our process, which we’ve tested extensively, yields excellent results provided you use the right oil, and don’t rush the process. 

What you need:

Freshly cast iron pan cookware
It’s important that the pan be as cleaned down to the bare iron if possible. All prior seasoning should be removed with a lye solution, and any rust must be removed with vinegar, or electrolysis. 

Flaxseed oil
The choice of oil is very important. It’s necessary to choose an oil that will polymerize, harden, and adhere to the pan. Flaxseed oil is a common choice, but we’ve also gotten satisfactory results from shortening (Crisco). 

Oven
Your home oven will heat the oil that’s been applied to the pan and cause it to harden and darken. This is the part of the process that can’t be rushed, it takes some time. 

The process:

  1. Wash your pan in hot soapy water to remove any surface oils. Then heat in a 200 ºF oven until completely dry. The heat will also ‘open’ up the iron making it more accepting of the seasoning.

  2. Apply a thin coat of flaxseed oil to the hot pan. Coat it entirely. You’ll want to use an oven mitt since the pan will be pretty hot. 

  3. Wipe away all of the remaining oil. There will still be a very thin coat on the pan, but it should not appear oily. Using too much oil will result in streaks and a sticky surface.  

  4. Bake the pan upside down in a 500 ºF oven for 30 minutes. Then shut the oven off and let the pan cool inside. Heating the oil will cause it to create polymer chains, making for a dark, smooth surface. 

  5. Repeat this seasoning process at least three times before cooking in the pan. The seasoning will continue to build as you use the pan, becoming  darker and increasingly non-stick. The pan will also be easier to clean as the seasoning layer builds.  

You should always heat cast iron with something in it, even if it’s only a bit of cooking oil. You can damage the seasoning by overheating it. Avoid cooking acidic foods such as tomatoes or citrus in the pan for long periods of time. They’ll react with the seasoning and the iron and impart an unpleasant flavor.

To clean, deglaze the pan with a bit of water while it is still hot. Let the pan cool and use your hands or a plastic scrub pad to remove any stubborn bits of food. A bit of kosher salt can also be used to soak up excess oil, and to act as a mild abrasive. Many folks advocate for not using any soap at all, but we’ve found a small amount of dish soap won’t harm a well seasoned pan. But do avoid using harsh abrasives and cleaning detergents. Wipe thoroughly dry, or heat on the stove top to dry, and store in a safe, dry place. 

With proper seasoning (don’t rush it) and proper care a vintage cast iron pan will last for generations to come.