Roddy Körner

instagram:

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram

Since launching nearly four years ago, it has always been a priority to bring the Instagram community simple yet powerful tools that let people capture moments and express their creativity. Today, we’re excited to announce Hyperlapse from Instagram, a new app to capture high-quality time lapse videos even while in motion.

Traditionally, time lapse videos depend on holding your phone or camera still while you film. Hyperlapse from Instagram features built-in stabilization technology that lets you create moving, handheld time lapses that result in a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.

We designed Hyperlapse to be as simple as possible. You don’t need an account to create a hyperlapse. Instead, you open up straight to the camera. Tap once to begin recording and tap again to stop. Choose a playback speed that you like between 1x-12x and tap the green check mark to save it to your camera roll. You can share your video on Instagram easily from there.

From documenting your whole commute in seconds or the preparation of your dinner from start to finish to capturing an entire sunset as it unfolds, we’re thrilled about the creative possibilities Hyperlapse unlocks. We can’t wait to see what you’ll create.

To learn more about what stabilization looks like in Hyperlapse, check out this video.

To learn more about Hyperlapse from Instagram, check out help.instagram.com.

Hyperlapse from Instagram is available today for iOS devices in Apple’s App Store. It is currently only available for iOS.


bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska
bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho
If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.
On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 
The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.
Other useful Links:
How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper
How to be a BLM smokejumper
Smokejumper status report
McCall Jumplist
Young Men and Fire
Stats:
McCall base was founded in 1943
John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
There are currently 70 active jumpers
McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska

bestmadeco:

The McCall Smokejumper Base, McCall Idaho

If drawing little to no distinction between work and play is an art, then the smokejumper is an artist. There are few lives that combine such extreme adventure with demanding, grueling, dangerous work. The notion of propelling men from planes into forest fires was first proposed in 1934 and promptly dismissed. By 1940 the demented notion prevailed and the first jump was made into the Nez Perce National Forest. Since then the frequency and scale of forest fires increases at an alarming rate, more men and women jump to save them, more lives are taken, and so the battle to save our public lands would be a losing one if it were not for these brave few.

On a recent trip to Idaho we stopped in to say hello to the McCall Smokejumpers. The McCall Smokejumper base is home to some 70 active jumpers, and is one of the largest and most active smokejumper bases in the US. Needless to say the smokejumpers we met were young, fit, and focussed. Our tour of the base took place during the height of the fire season, and the energy among the crew was clear as day. The McCall facilities themselves are impressive, and the skills that are required to be a smokejumper even more so. The McCall base even has its own sewing room where each smokejumper is expected to repair and fabricate (often from scratch) their parachutes, packs, and other soft gear. 

The McCall base offers regular tours by active smokejumpers. To learn more visit the McCall Smokejumper Base website.

Other useful Links:

How to be a National Forest Service smokejumper

How to be a BLM smokejumper

Smokejumper status report

McCall Jumplist

Young Men and Fire

Stats:

  • McCall base was founded in 1943
  • John Ferguson and Lester Gahlerat make first jumps
  • 1949 12 jumpers are killed at Mann Gulch
  • 1980 Boise smokejumper unit moved to McCall
  • 1981 first woman smokejumps from McCall
  • There are currently 70 active jumpers
  • McCall base is adjacent to 6 National Forests
  • McCall jumpers will travel all over west coast and even Alaska

8 Places You Must Visit in Japan

ileftmyheartintokyo:

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Truth is, after 3 weeks in Japan, I was sold. Strike that. I was actually sold in the first few hours in Tokyo, right after my mind cleared a bit of the fog it was submerged into during the intercontinental flight. The scenarios revealing in front of me were so different from everything I previously knew and so unbelievable, that I gave in and only days into our trip, I already knew Japan was the most amazing country I’ve ever been too and probably I’ll ever go to. Its culture is so uniquely beautiful, the customs so incredible and the people so civilized, that it almost makes my eyes water. 
During our trip to Japan we used a JR Pass, and this gave us great mobility and flexibility when it came to exploring different parts of the country. It also made the formalities more swift, as we avoided the cues in front of the ticket offices. But what we both liked best about this travel style was that all in all, we didn’t need much planning ahead and we could allow spontaneity to take over from time to time. So we ended up exploring quite a few places in Kanto, Chubu and Kinki regions in central Japan. Here are only the ones we consider a definite must see.  

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Tokyo

Tokyo grew on me in unexpected ways, to the point that I know refer to it as my favorite city in the whole world. Of course, this is highly subjective, but as I think anyone who visited this mad city would agree, Tokyo is a different world altogether. You’ll probably either love it or hate it, but there’s little space in between for this place to leave you cold. What makes Tokyo so special in my eyes is simple: the people. Don’t expect neither futuristic, nor beautiful architecture. But with over 13 million people walking it’s streets every day, the capital of Japan definitely has a soul and multiple personalities. Best places to see my point proven right are a stop at Shibuya and a stroll through Yoyogi Park on a Sunday.

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Must. Visit. Tokyo. Soon!